Nigerian dating scam example article on dating for teenagers

Not everyone using online dating sites is looking for love. As if all that isn’t bad enough, romance scammers are now involving their victims in online bank fraud.Scammers create fake online profiles using photos of other people — even stolen pictures of real military personnel. And they tug at your heartstrings with made-up stories about how they need money — for emergencies, hospital bills, or travel. Here’s how it works: The scammers set up dating profiles to meet potential victims.While online dating sites work hard to eliminate scammers from their sites, unfortunately some continue to be very deceptive and get past the fraud checks so it is important to be aware of what a potential scammer might attempt to do.Nobody wants to be scammed yet most people are not quite sure what to look out for.He's hunting through chat rooms, dating sites and social networking sites searching for victims, looking to cash in on romance.If you are over 40, recently divorced, a widow, elderly or disabled then all the better in his eyes.The Nigerian scam is also called the "419" scam because 419 is the article of the Nigerian penal code that prosecutes fraud. Your best defense against a Nigerian scam is not to fall for it in the first place.

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Here's a sample email message from "Sandra," a scammer who targeted a scambaiter called "Justin Credible": When Justin responded with a fake address, Sandra sent this: 1. (Keep in mind that Truth Finder can only pull reports for people living in the U.

These heartless fraudsters, known as Nigerian scammers, are much, much worse than your parasitic ex. The Nigerian scam has long been flagged as a common type of cyber crime. Financial Crimes Division of the Secret Service reportedly receives 100 calls a day from people claiming to be victims of a Nigerian scam. Here's how the con typically works: You get an email from someone asking for your help. To obtain an arrest warrant for the perpetrator, you'd have to acquire a huge body of evidence of email communications, phony documents, bank transactions, etc.

Then, once you hand over your banking info and pay a "small fee" to cover the expenses related to the transfer, the so-called "prince" sucks your savings dry. If an unsolicited email reads like a drunk text, it's probably a hoax. That's a clear sign that Sandra doesn't know what the hell she's talking about. Spare yourself the trauma of a drawn-out, potentially inconclusive criminal investigation.

Instead of sending spam letters that promise millions for your assistance, these scammers are targeting single men and women who are searching for love online.

They use psychological tricks to lure their victims in, use poetry and even gifts to get them under their spell, and then once you are there, will try to reach for your wallet, all the time declaring their "undying love" for you.

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